Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Shabby Chic Kitchen, Dollhouse Part 5

Back with another dollhouse update.  As I mentioned yesterday, I searched high and low for a kitchen set for the dollhouse, but just couldn't quite find what I was looking for.  I even made a sketch of the kitchen that I had in mind, thinking that would help me find it, but I still couldn't find anything like it. Finally, I decided to just build it myself from scratch.  Just a few supplies and some imagination was all that I needed.

Welcome to my little Shabby Chic Kitchen...





The kitchen is not finished yet, but I wanted to share what I have so far. I still need to make curtains for the window over the sink and I'm thinking about adding an island.

To build the kitchen, I bought a bag of random size pieces of basswood at Hobby Lobby for $5.39 ($8.99 - 40% off coupon).  


I used the same tools as for the trim, that I discussed in the previous post (Building a Dollhouse, Part 4), so I didn't have to buy any additional tools. I cut every piece with the utility knife and the metal straight edge ruler, unless it was small enough to cut with the Easy Cutter Ultimate. I didn't use a saw to cut anything. The only power tool I used was a drill to drill a few holes.  

I should have taken more pictures during the building process, but I spent most of the time just trying to figure out "how" to do it.  It was a lot of thinking, sketching, measuring, cutting, gluing, and a lot of trial and error. I stained the wood before painting, so that I could sand off the paint in places to give it the shabby chic look that I wanted. I mixed the Weathered Glass and off-white paint to make it a softer, lighter color.


The refrigerator was built out of basswood too. I cut little strips of basswood to make shelves on the door. I painted the refrigerator first with Gesso, then with white acrylic paint. If you haven't used Gesso before, it is a great craft supply to have on hand. Painting with Gesso first will provide a smooth, finely textured surface on canvas, paper, wood, or plaster. Artists use it to size (prepare) their canvas for painting. I bought a small pair of hinges to attach the refrigerator door.


This kitchen has some elements from my own kitchen, and some are just dream kitchen.  I have an apron front farmhouse sink, so I knew I wanted to make a miniature one like mine. I glued together little pieces of basswood that I had cut to size, to make a box shape. Once dried, I sanded the edges to make them rounded like my sink. I drilled a hole for the drain. I had never used a power drill before, but I learned how for this project. I even learned how to change the drill bit to the size I wanted. I painted the sink with Gesso, which gave it a smooth porcelain-like finish. 


Then, I painted the sink with white acrylic paint, and around the drain with gray and silver paint. I made a little curtain for under the sink. I made the faucet from copper wire leftover from when we built our house. I used pliers to bend the wire into a shape that I liked. I used a mixture of Tacky Glue and copper colored paint and applied it with a toothpick to make a little ball on the end of the wire for the spout. I dipped the handles in the mixture too to fill in the loops.  I rounded a piece of wood for a faucet base, painted it copper, and drilled holes to fit the faucet and handles.  The faucet and handles can be turned.


In my house, all of my cabinets have doors, but I did open shelves in these cabinets so I could see all of the adorable little miniatures that will eventually be in this little kitchen.


I wanted an old fashioned style refrigerator, instead of a modern stainless steel one like mine.  I sanded the corners to give it a rounded top.  The line on the front is just carved to separate the freezer on top, but the door is all one solid piece.  I knew exactly what I wanted the handle to look like, "old fashioned". I looked around the house, and found the perfect item to use as the handle. Can anyone guess what the handle actually was?  Hint: it is made of silver metal and it came from an ordinary everyday household object.


The top two shelves are the freezer compartment and the bottom three shelves are the refrigerator.  I'll make some ice cream to go in the freezer soon.  I glued a tiny magnet on the door, and  I cut a piece of metal from a picture hanger to glue inside the refrigerator to catch the door magnet, which keeps the door closed.


In case you noticed that the freezer needs defrosting (remember this is an old fashioned refrigerator), here's how I did that.  I painted the inside surfaces of the freezer with Tacky Glue, then I sprinkled Fun Flock on the glue. An instant frosted refrigerator. You can get Fun Flock in the scrapbooking and embossing area of the craft store.  It's been in my craft supplies for a long time.


The stove is made of basswood and painted with Gesso and white acrylic paint just like the refrigerator and sink.  To make the stove top, I first glued 4 silver beads where the burners go with E6000 glue.


Next, I glued two different sized stainless steel washers for each burner.


For the top of the burner I used four rubber O-ring seals from the plumbing department at Lowe's.  I also used Size 3 Hook and Eyes from the sewing department at Hobby Lobby.  I clipped off the hook part and slid 4 hooks on to each seal to make the black grate part of the burners. I glued these on with Tacky Glue since I needed a glue that dried clear (E6000 dries white).


I shaped the stove knobs from silver polymer clay.  The oven handle is carved from basswood and painted silver.


I painted the inside of the oven with grey paint, then speckled it with black and white paint. I glued a piece of clear plastic cut from packaging on to the inside of the oven door. The door is hinged by drilling a tiny hole through the door frame and into the door on each side at the bottom, and inserting the thicker part of a toothpick with some glue.  It works perfectly as a hinge.


I added two drawers to hold silverware, etc.


I shaped two tiny pieces of basswood and attached them to a piece of dowel to make a towel holder on the end of the cabinet.


 Here is how the stove and cabinet looks in the kitchen.


Above the stove are open shelves to display some miniatures. Behind the shelves, I attached a piece of the same fabric that I used for the curtain under the sink. On the shelves is a Cherry Tea Set from Hobby Lobby, a set of Cherry Canisters from Michael's, and two unusually shaped glass bottles with corks that I found in the jewelry department at Hobby Lobby.  Inside is real Olive Oil in one and Balsamic Vinegar in the other.


The backsplash is made from a sheet of dark brown embossed paper from Hobby Lobby.  It looked like tile to me, so I wrapped a piece of basswood with it and painted it with Gesso. This is what the paper looked like before painting it with Gesso.


After painting it with Gesso, I painted it with white acrylic paint, then I dry brushed it with my Cottage Rose paint, so that it just picked up the color on the raised parts. I finished it with a coat of Glossy Mod Podge to make it shiny.


Here is another shot of the stove, the shelves, and refrigerator.




Some very excited dolls have been waiting patiently to try out this kitchen. 

Twinkle climbs to reach the shelves and Amelia Thimble helps with washing up the dishes.  :)




Little Pullip Stica is ready to go to work as a maid in this little kitchen.




Mini American Girl Kirsten cooks up something delicious for her friend Felicity.

Kit gets the dessert out of the freezer.



My daughters keep asking me who is going to live in this dollhouse. This dollhouse is the standard 1:12 scale or 1 inch scale, and I built the kitchen to that scale too.  In case you're new to dollhouses, this means 1 inch = 1 foot.  So the countertops are 3" high, which is equivalent to 3 feet high in real life (standard kitchen counter height).  The ceilings are 9" high, which is equivalent to 9' ceilings in our houses.

The mini American Girls fit, but they look a little large in there.  This makes sense because they are 6" high, which would equal 6' tall in real life.  Six feet is fine for adult height, but mini AG dolls look like little girls, which makes them look a little big in this scale.

Amelia Thimble (Wilde Imagination) and Twinkle (Fairyland RealPuki BJD) are a little small, but since Amelia is a little girl and Twinkle is a fairy, you would expect them to be smaller than adults.

Hmmm... who should be the residents of this house?  What do you think?
Don't forget to leave your guess below about what the refrigerator door handle originally was.

Hugs,
Lisa


38 comments:

  1. I have just caught up with your doll house posts and I am amazed! Wow you are talented! This is incredible!

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    1. MCooper, Thank you so much for your sweet comments!!! You are such a doll!
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  2. Replies
    1. Ginger, you are right! It is the clip from an ink pen. It was the perfect size and shape to use as an old fashioned refrigerator handle! Thanks for leaving your guess! You figured it out! :)
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  3. I'm guessing the fridge handle is a pen clip (though a repurposed tie tack was my first thought).

    The burners on the stove were inspired: I use hook & eyes all the time and I'm not sure I would have thought of them for this (but I won't forget now!).

    I think the Little Pullip looks the most 'at home' in the new kitchen :)

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    1. Yes Scraps, you are correct! The fridge handle is a clip from an ink pen. It's funny how doing miniatures can make you look at things in a whole new light. Anything small has the potential to become something else. I'd love to hear some of the uses you have found for hook & eyes.

      The Little Pullip fits in there pretty well, she is just a little short. She is a little bigger than Amelia Thimble, but she looks older I too, I think. The counter is about chest high on her when she's standing right next to it. I think she looks cute in the kitchen wearing her frilly maid's outfit. :)
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  4. Ha quedado muy bonita. La nevera y los quemadores son muy originales.

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    1. Thank you Isabel for leaving a comment! My first comment in Spanish! According to Google Translate, Isabel said: "It has been very nice. The fridge and burners are very original." Thank you Isabel!

      I just found your blog and your forging work is amazing. I especially love your little shelf for the bathroom! I just took a tour of your "Elisa House", and it is beautiful! I love all of the little details you have in there! I'm going back to see more.
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  5. Wow, fantastic job. I was going to guess the frig handle was a zipper pull but see that I was wrong. Did you make the step stool too?

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    1. Thank you Nealie Jean!!! Zipper pull was a good guess. Hmmm... wonder what we could use a zipper pull for. :)
      I didn't make the step stool, found it on ebay. It is a metal folding step stool, which I thought it was so cool that it could actually close. Since it's metal it's perfect for Twinkle. She can stand on it without falling because of the magnets in her feet. Here's a link to the ebay store where I found it.
      http://www.ebay.com/itm/Miniature-White-Metal-Folding-Kitchen-Step-Stool-DOLLHOUSE-Miniatures-1-12-/400677473954?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d4a3d0ea2
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  6. WOW! Awesome! Stunning! Fabulous! So beyond cool...LOVE it!

    Is that a pen clip that you used for the fridge handle? It made me giggle. And the stove top burners...Ingenious re-purposing.

    Ah, so my mini AG girls will probably look too big for my house too. The current inhabitants are 6" dolls, but the Dazzle and Glamour fashion dolls from the 80s. They are exceedingly petite next to the AG.

    I can't wait to see what is next! There used to be a great miniatures shoppe in Peddlar's Village (Lahaska PA) That my mom and I would visit and I'd just gaze at all the neat tiny things. I don't know if it is still there or not, but very fond memories.

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    1. Thank you Melody! Yes, you are correct, that is a pen clip for the fridge handle.
      Your mini AG girls should fit fine in your dollhouse, and look really cute on most of the 1:12 scale furniture. The beds and sofas are a good size for them. I think in the kitchen is where you really notice if a doll is too tall or short in comparison to the counters and refrigerator.

      Oh, the miniatures shoppe sounds wonderful! I would love to go to one!!! It is so awesome that you have those special memories with your mom!
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  7. This is STUNNING!!!!! I am in love with this kitchen! How gorgeous, your attention to detail is fabulous. (and your patience). The step stool is adorable too.

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    1. Thank you Rhonda! That mean so much coming from you! I am in love with all of the houses you've created on Snickerdoodle Street!
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  8. This is such a lovely Kitchen, great work !��

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  9. This is too adorable for words!!! You are so creative and clever. Any doll would be happy to have such a wonderful kitchen.

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    1. Thank you for your sweet comments Funky Momma!!!
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  10. I am absolutely amazed Lisa! You have done such an incredible job of that kitchen. I showed my hubby and he said you must have a fabulous imagination to have utilized all those little bits and pieces to create it. I just love the fridge and stove . . . the whole kitchen wowed me!
    Cheers,
    X

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    1. Thank you Xanadu! That is so sweet! Working on something like this really sparks your creativity. I have had so much fun with it!
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  11. mind = blown. This is incredible. I'm totally inspired and intimidated all at the same time, haha! Really fantastic job, you're so creative. I LOVE this project, and that kitchen is perfect. The flocking in the freezer was SUCH a perfect touch.

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    1. Thank you so much CypressDoll! I am so happy that you are enjoying reading about my dollhouse project. It is so much fun to have you guys to share it with.
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  12. I am inspired, in awe and have feelings of inadequacy all at the same time. I *have* to buckle down and do some of the doll projects I've been longing to, but afraid, to tackle!

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    1. Hi Barb! I tend to do the same thing. Sometimes I want to do something, but put off starting it because I'm not sure it will come out like I want, especially when something I have never tried before. My Mary Engelbreight note pad says "Begin anywhere, just begin". So go ahead, be inspired, tackle it, just begin, and have fun! :)
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  13. You are so crafty! Awesome job!!!!

    ~Kewpie83/Ashley

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  14. Hi Lisa, I want to tell you I love what you did with the kitchen. The whole stove area looks amazing. So much better than anything you would have found in a store or bought online. This doll house that you have been working on with your husband is going to make a wonderful heirloom piece for your family. You have put so much though and detail in this.

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    1. Thank you Laura! It seems like it's the tiniest details that brings a doll house to life. I think I'm having more fun with the details than the actual construction. :)
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  15. Now that I've been looking more, I have a question. What did you use to make the base of the sink, and the decorative piece directly under the sink that I presume is wood? Those would take a little more cutting than just a straight piece.

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    1. Hi Barb, I wanted a decorative scalloped detail for under the sink. I took a strip of basswood and cut away at it with my utility knife until I got a shape I liked. Then I sanded the edges smooth with an emery board, and glued it in place.

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  16. I am in awe of this kitchen, and can't believe you created everything from scratch! I wish I had the patience and imagination to make things to fit a vision. Thank you for sharing this!

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    1. Thank you Rebecca! You can do it too! I'm here to encourage you! If you need any help, just let me know!
      Hugs,
      Lisa

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  17. OMG!!!!! You are SO talented!!!!! ~Amelia

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  18. I'm just starting out a project to build a 1/12 scale treehouse and stumbled across your blog. This kitchen is just absolutely perfect--the little details are unbelievable! I was wondering if you could tell me, when you make furniture out of the basswood, how to you put it together? Is it just glued?

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    1. Hi Kristin,
      Yes the basswood is just put together with glue. My favorite glue is Fast Grab Tacky Glue. I use it in combination with a Super Glue. I've been using Locktite Super Glue or Gorilla Glue Super Glue. What I usually do is apply the Fast Grab Tacky to one side and a few drops of Super Glue to the other side. Press together and hold until you get a good solid bond. It's best to clamp them together for a while. Best of luck with your treehouse. My first dollhouse was a treehouse too! :)

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  19. Your dollhouse is amazing! I can't believe all the details and care that went into creating this kitchen, it kind of blows my mind. I have never done anything with miniatures or dollhouses before but have just bought a kit and am doing some research before I start. Your work and creativity are amazing. Beautiful!

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  20. Have definitely bookmarked the Kitchen article-very inspirational- like you blog ! Thanks for sharing your project with us/ me – looks fantastic.

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